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Fix Cracked Leather

So, with that said I’m going to give you what I call the “quick fix”. A temporary fix to get you by until the car is sold or you get enough money to do it right. Now I’m not going to give you some substandard way of fixing your leather seat, remember I do this for a living and from time to time I have been asked to do the “quick fix” to get someone by. Although I don’t like doing that for the people I do work for. To me thats my name and reputation that is on that repair, but when someones in a pinch you got to help them out.

Supplies…. you will need some stuff before you start this project and most of them you can get from your automotive paint store.

  • Denatured alcohol – used for prep
  • sandpaper – used for prep and sanding of cracks in leather 240 grit and 400 grit a couple of sheets of each will be good.
  • 1 aerosol can of Sem Plastic and Leather Prep – if not available not really necessary but nice to have. helps to open the pores of the leather to help the adhesion of the dye.
  • 1 aerosol can of Sem Classic Coat or Sem Sure Coat leather dyes (if you get the sure coat, it’s waterborne and is a lot more flexible and more like the finish already on the leather and will not dry the leather out). But most auto stores only carry the Classic Coat which will work, just don’t load the dye on, the more chance for it crack later. Now take the vehicle with you or something to match the color, if you ask the guys at the auto paint store they can probably find the right color for you.
  • A sealer of some sort is needed to seal the raw leather before you dye it but not always necessary. If available Thompson Water Seal will work, or a leather sealer like Leather Tac this will help the dye adhere to the raw leather and help to smooth out some of the rough leather. Another trick is glue, but it needs to be a flexible glue and one that does not contain silicone. If you can get leather glue from your local craft store that would be perfect. Glue will seal the leather and lay down the rough leather.
  • 1 can of a plastic adhesion promoter, I like Bulldog easy to use and it works
  • terry cloth towels
  • paper towels
  • soft scrub brush
  • Scotch Brite pad – green one is fine
  • rubber gloves
  • hair dryer – helps speed things up a little