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Dual Clutch Transmission

The main disadvantage of having a dual clutch transmission in your car is the price. Replacing this type of system requires skill. It is a complicated clutch kit system that needs electronic and mechanical knowledge.

The dual clutch transmission is also known as a semi-automatic transmission. This transmission provides the functionality of two manual transmissions in one. Once the driver changes from one gear to another gear in a regular stick shift car, the first thing that should be done is to press the clutch pedal. This will disconnect the engine from the gearbox and at the same time, it will disconnect current from the transmission.

The driver uses the stick shift to select a new gear as speed increases and torque decreases, which will involve moving a toothed collar from a gear wheel to another gear wheel which has different sizes. Furthermore, there is a device called the synchronizer that helps match the gears so that there is no grinding. Mechanically, it makes sure that the gears are engaged.

The clutch kit includes a disc or grip pressure plate; although some clutch kits have pilot bushings or pilot bearings. All these items have specific functions that are included in the clutch kit.

The flow of power from the engine to the wheel does not exist in a conventional manual transmission. During gearshifts the power will turn on and off then back on again. This will cause a shift shock or what is called a torque interrupt. Sophisticated electronics and hydraulics control the clutches just like in a standard automatic transmission. Clutches operate individually when using a dual clutch transmission, one will control the odd gears and the other will control the even gears.